Vietnam on Video: Part 2

26th October 2020

A collection of clips predominantly featuring western people and their views on Vietnam. I have also added some suggested sequences for pronunciation practice … and so, without further ado …

First time in Viet Nam – First impressions of Viet Nam

A vlog by Divert Living, posted just over two years ago and which has already received more than a million hits:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHnQKvU8OiA&t=547s

Pronunciation Practice:

[American English accent]

Try 04:44 – 04:53

” … and I asked them, ‘How much is aqua (water) ?’ Aqua’s fifteen thousand, beer’s twenty thousand … of course I’m gonna get the beer, now … it’s just as expensive as the water.”

09:00 – 0913

“Fun fact, Vietnamese cuisine is considered one of the healthiest cuisines in the world … and, to go with the food, the size of the dining tables and chairs are super small.”

This vlog was shot in Ha Noi, so let’s get their take (their opinion, view, experience) on Sai Gon:

What to expect – Saigon or HCMC

Now they travel to my neck of the woods (the area I live in or was brought up in), and they encounter, among many other delights, coconut coffee:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iw_K-1AmVk&t=661s

Pronunciation Practice:

09:50 – 10.00

“Wow … that’s so strong, but it’s got a ball of coconut ice-cream in the middle … whoah !”

And the young lady who I believe is Korean adds:

“I wanna try … This is the coffee king … ahhhhhhhh !”

Talking Point:

The young travellers give their views on the environment and cleanliness of District 1 which is the city centre [UK] or downtown area [USA].

To what extent do you agree with them ?

What do Vietnamese students think of the Vlogger’s appraisal of Sai Gon ?

Let’s move on and talk about traffic which is quite a serious issue in Vietnam. Firstly, attending driving school … what can go wrong ? A clip from the world-famous motoring show from the BBC, ‘Top Gear.’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1xNTBLgq4c

[UK English accent]

Right from the get go (from the very start) we have some great lines:

“Cheer up … this is gonna be a doodle … [Vietnamese] … it wasn’t !”

01.23 – 01:45

“How the hell … what did you just do ?”

“It was eighteen. Eighteen years old.”

“How did you know ?”

“Did you not bother learning Vietnamese before we came here ?”

“Well, no.”

“You’re screwed, then.”

Time for some food and the ubiqitous Phở My favourite TV chef, Mr Keith Floyd, who sadly passed away in 2009. He came to Asia, and visited Vietnam and now he’s going to tell you about Phở:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fO6cSQ8Vly8&list=PL4JTuMl25i9kPkTq5rGPVRNyhU0GPK1PT

[UK English accent]

02:32 – 02:38 and continuing up to 03:05

“Vietnamese are industrious, hard-working, incredibly energetic people …”

“So, the most essential thing here in Vietnam is a great breakfast, a thing called a pho.”

What goes in a pho, Keith ?

“You might put chicken, you might put meat, you might put fish but as long as you’ve got noodles and a rich stock, you can’t go wrong.”

How English people dress …

Top 5 Coolest Celebrity Chefs Ever! « Appliances Online Blog
Cheers
Far Flung Floyd | DVD | Buy Now | at Mighty Ape NZ
Top Gear Vietnam Special - Tour Vietnam With Quality Motorbike Rentals
Three Englishmen in Sai Gon

How English people really dress. Thanks for visiting my blog. All the best.

Vietnam on video Part 1

23rd October 2020

A compilation of videos about Viet Nam for use in class. Some clips are made by westerners, other by Vietnamese speaking English. The clips can be used for listening practice, learning vocabulary, pronunciation, or just to learn more about the country.

Contents:

Vietnamese beer review

Vietnamese culture

Vietnamese superstitions

Lights, camera, action !

Vietnamese beer review (Sai Gon Red): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKr6Cj-Xr9g&list=LLfquznE0joCgmA3v1PIQ0CQ&index=8&t=1s

This is an English man, a beer-lover, who uses lots of everyday language, slang and metaphors. Listen out for:

Let’s dive in / coming in at … / head (the white foam on top of beer) / oh, blimey, that’s awful ! /

Vietnamese culturehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBAi_b__l_c

To what extent do you agree with her comments ?

I agree totally // I agree to an extent // I’m not sure I totally agree // That has not been my experience // She is spot on ! // She is over-simplifying // There’s an element of truth in what she says // She’s talking nonsense !

Vietnamese superstitions:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmtyCvW9nbc

The speaker has a long introduction so you can listen to her American accent and try to imitate her, as well as learning new expressions.

Which superstitions have you heard of ? Do you believe in them ? Have you experienced any ?

What does she say about three people in a picture ?

About sleeping with your feet facing a mirror

About saying someone’s full name at night (04:15)

Wearing what colour brings good luck ? (06:00) How about, “Wearing white in your head ?” (07:24)

How about if you run over a cat ? (08:20)

Listening exercise: Computer safety.

13th May 2020

Young asian girls smiling and happy using laptop computer ...

Today is an extended listening piece from the British Council website, then some suggestions for talking subjects in which you can practice using any new vocabulary.

Listen first and see how much you understand. You will probably need to replay the recording several times.

Finally, listen along with the text, repeating any expressions and copying intonation and stress.

Listening practice: Online Safety: http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/skills/listening-skills-practice/online-safety-conversation

Asian Mother with Her Son Stock Footage Video (100% Royalty-free ...


Charlie: 
Mum! That’s my computer!
Mum: I know, I know. Don’t worry, I’m changing your privacy settings.
Charlie: Privacy settings?
Mum: Yes. There are privacy settings on your social networking sites. Your account is totally public at the moment, and you’re logged in!
Charlie: Oh. What are the privacy settings for?
Mum: To make you safe online. You want to be safe, don’t you? And for the right people to see your information, not EVERYONE.
Charlie: Everyone?
Mum: Yes. If you don’t change your privacy settings, when you upload a photo, anyone can see it. It’s important to change them so only your friends can see them. You don’t want everyone to see everything, do you?
Charlie: No! But I can delete things, can’t I?
Mum: Well, you can, but it’s very difficult. Some things stay there forever.
Charlie: That’s really scary, Mum.
Mum: Don’t worry, but you must learn how to stay safe. You mustn’t tell anyone your password!
Charlie: I won’t!
Mum: Crazy Charlie one two one, isn’t it?
Charlie: Mum! Yes, it is. How …
Mum: It’s on your notebook. Right there. On your desk. It isn’t a very secret place, is it?
Charlie: No, it isn’t.
Charlie: 
Mum! That’s my computer!
Mum: I know, I know. Don’t worry, I’m changing your privacy settings.
Charlie: Privacy settings?
Mum: Yes. There are privacy settings on your social networking sites. Your account is totally public at the moment, and you’re logged in!
Charlie: Oh. What are the privacy settings for?
Mum: To make you safe online. You want to be safe, don’t you? And for the right people to see your information, not EVERYONE.
Charlie: Everyone?
Mum: Yes. If you don’t change your privacy settings, when you upload a photo, anyone can see it. It’s important to change them so only your friends can see them. You don’t want everyone to see everything, do you?
Charlie: No! But I can delete things, can’t I?
Mum: Well, you can, but it’s very difficult. Some things stay there forever.
Charlie: That’s really scary, Mum.
Mum: Don’t worry, but you must learn how to stay safe. You mustn’t tell anyone your password!
Charlie: I won’t!
Mum: Crazy Charlie one two one, isn’t it?
Charlie: Mum! Yes, it is. How …
Mum: It’s on your notebook. Right there. On your desk. It isn’t a very secret place, is it?
Charlie: No, it isn’t.

Talking subjects

computer dangers

Do you have passwords ? Do you have DIFFERENT passwords for different websites ?

Is your password complicated and contain a mix of letters, numbers and symbols ( jT4u#p2W%) or easy to guess (john2020).

What should you be careful of when opening emails ?

Have you ever been a victim of an online crime ?

Do you know of any scams in your country ?

Photos: Two Nigerian "romance scammers" preying on gullible Thai women on  Facebook, arrested in Bangkok
Thai police arresting two online scammers

A scam is a trick to cheat people into paying for something they either don’t need or will never receive for example, pretending to be from Microsoft and saying that the user’s computer is infected BUT it can be fixed IF the user sends money.

Scam and Virus Alerts | Professional Computer Systems
A typical computer scam

Listening exercises: Top Gear Special … what can go wrong ?

28th April 2020

Movie] Top Gear - Vietnam Special - KLNetBB

Top Gear is a famous British show about cars, motoring, driving and crashing !

Here is an opportunity to hear British English being spoken at a natural pace, and to learn new expressions and colloquialisms (everyday spoken words, not usually found in student text books).

Top Gear Vietnam

Top Gear filming hour-long special in Vietnam | Autoblog

The chaps arrive in Vietnam are are given a challenge … to buy a car for 15 million Dong. That sounds a lot of money, but it is nowhere near enough to buy a car, not even an old, second-hand one. Instead they decide they can only afford motorbikes.

Now for the challenge.

This clip has subtitles. Watch it repeatedly, concentrating on the body language, the expressions on the faces and the way two of the men are excited while Jeremy (the very tall man in the Vietnam T-shirt) is less than happy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKg-jCV-YM0&list=PLPJI_c2ou1sQgmufw3aUzI1h5ZLQpZybv&index=2

[Note: some of the subtitles are WRONG !]

The challenge is to ride their motorbikes from Sai Gon (Ho Chi Minh City) to the North, past Ha Noi, near the Chinese border.

Don't do the Top Gear Vietnam Thing: Part 1 - Adventure Rider

Richard, the smallest man, tells Jeremy his scooter will be useless … why ?

What expression does Richard use to mean ‘out of control’ ?

How does James, the man in the white shirt, describe the challenge ?

What is Jeremy’s reaction ? Can you copy his expression and voice ?

Confession: I find myself rewatching the Vietnam special all the ...

What would be the problem riding a bike like this Vietnam ?

What is the longest or strangest or worst journey you have ever made ?

Tell the class about it, trying to use as many new expressions as you can, and with the appropriate stress and intonation.

Pronunciation

Try to sound like to the chaps – intonation and stress and phrases.

Top Gear Vietnam (07.00 – 8.46): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1zfuBgCUqY&t=48s

Worst car in the world

What are the problems ? Can you imitate Jeremy’s intonation ?

“…known in Vietnam as the ‘common car’ has an engine, but it’s hard to say what sort.”

watch the whole clip here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nd5ka91fkDo

New Technology Information: Top Gear Season 12

Listening: real-world clips.

20th April 2020

The following clips are provided not only for listening practice but also for speaking: try to copy, to imitate, the speakers. Listen out for the intonation, stress and rhythm of these native-speakers.

And now, without further ado, the first clip:

The Queen

Every Christmas, The Queen addresses the nation (make a ten-minute TV appearance). This clip has subtitles so you will be able to follow what Her Majesty says, looking up any new words.

For pronunciation practice, I suggest listening to very short extracts and trying to copy the voice. The Queen, naturally, speaks Queen’s English (the most prestigious form of standard English).

Actor Benedict Cumberbatch

Do you know this actor ? How much can you understand ?

Shakespearean pronunciation:

This includes the famous opening lines from Richard III

Now is the winter of our discontent

Made glorious summer by this son of York

The phrase ‘winter of our discontent’ or ‘winter of discontent’ has entered the language and is frequently quoted in newspapers, blogs and everyday conversation.

In the quote, Richard is referring to the new king, Edward IV, from the York dynasty. He plays with the words ‘son’ and ‘sun’, comparing the new king with the spring sun chasing away the misery and despair of an English winter.

For more real-life clips, and listening exercises, click on this link: https://thaypaulsnotes.com/2019/01/23/listening-skills-tips-and-links/

Listening exercises: English classes

10th April 2020

Chia nhỏ 5 loại kỹ năng cần thiết trước và trong khi nghe Tiếng ...

This selection of clips are all aimed at English-language learners. The speech, therefore, will be slower and clearer, vocabulary simpler than real-world videos (which I shall feature in the next Listening blog), as well as a noticeable absence of idioms, phrases and expressions.

Contents:

American English in real life

Vocabulary Booster: learn new words while listening to a non-native accent.

An English learning adventure

The weather: A British Council video

Listening practice:

American English in real life:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQiepxGSQwI&list=PLt_HlHMBZtkBh9PRnFzFbU1eaBed4HfM9

Start watching at 02:00 until 03:13

What new vocabulary do you notice ?

What do you think of Alexandro ? What kind / type of person is he ?

What do you think of the boss ? How would you describe him ?

Use adjectives to describe how they look and their personality. 

NEXT: Learning new words while listening to an accent. Here, the speaker is Indian. Do you have any problems understanding her ?

Vocabulary booster (Indian lady teaches 20 words)

New Vocabulary:

Instead of using ‘very’ + adjective (I am very tired), use a single word:

Try to use ‘sagacious’, ‘exquisite’, ‘colossal’ and ‘spacious’

The apartments in Block D are ……….. (big)

The furnishings are perfect, they are ……….

Building an underground train network is a …………  undertaking

The old man was ………. People came to him for advise.

MOVING ON:

An English-learning adventure

FINALLY

A typical British subject: the weather. http://esol.britishcouncil.org/content/learners/skills/listening/weather-forecast

How Brits Love to Talk about the Weather | Andover and Villages

Taiwan: Listening special

12th April 2020

Hong Kong Journalists Under Pressure Over Taiwan WHO Reporting

Taiwan has featured in many online news clips recently. Here are some which caught my eye (made me notice) and which, furthermore, will be useful for students to practice listening to ‘real-world’ English speaking; the rhythms, stresses and intonations of everyday speech.

As with other blogs, I will drop in certain phrases or expressions, which I will highlight. In addition, there will be a lot of new vocabulary in the listening clips. Watch them in short sections, writing down any new words or phrases.

Feel free to ask me to explain anything you can’t understand

Additionally, I’d like to share a blog from my online friend, Silk Chatters, who is based in the USA, and writes extremely interesting articles. One such article, a blog which caught my eye, is about being critical when listening to news reports. Silk ends her blog with:

Question what you read and hear, and avoid a steady diet of one type of information, it’s as bad for the mind as eating only one type of food is for the body.

Here is the link to Silk’s blog: https://silkcordsblog.wordpress.com/2020/04/02/this-is-why-you-should-avoid-conspiracy-theories/

I know she will be delighted if you read and ‘like’ her blog.

In the UK, we pride ourselves on having a free press – newspapers, TV and other media are able to write what they want without fear of persecution (there are exceptions, naturally, but that is outside the scope of this blog).

However, newspaper readers generally know the political views of the paper they’re reading. In the USA I believe I’m right in saying that many TV news stations report the news according to their political opinions … or of those who own the station. For example, Fox News is seen as Republican (right-wing), while CNN is viewed as Democrat (left-wing).

Readers in the USA, please correct me if I am mistaken.

Therefore, when you see or read news, remember to ask questions and try to check the facts for yourself. A sophisticated readership will necessitate more sophisticated journalism … ideally … and what can be more ideal than the search for truth ?

Flag of the Republic of China - Wikipedia

The Corona Virus, COVID 19, continues to spread, and there are opposing theories as to its origins. The consensus is that it started in Wuhan Province, Mainland China. Taiwan, which is so close, has relatively few cases (at time of writing, 388 cases with 6 deaths compared to the official figures for China 82, 052 and 3, 339).

Relations between China and Taiwan are contentious (if you don’t know the history, the internet will help to fill you in – give you information)

Taiwan, whose capital is Taipei, “Shall be a democratic republic of the people, to be governed by the people and for the people.” Tsai Ing-wen is the President, and she features in our first clip: A YouTuber called Potter King met Tsai Ing-wen, and angered China by addressing her as ‘President’.

LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNrOxobXNx4

The President is shown here in a BBC interview, discusses relations between China and Taiwan:

China warned to show respect: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZcG9jy0TWQ

We now move on to a video clip that went viral. Dr Bruce Aylward was asked about Taiwan being admitted to the WHO (World Health Organisation). This is what happened:

Senior WHO dodges question: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlCYFh8U2xM&t=24s

The British newspaper ‘The Guardian’ covered the story here: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/30/senior-who-adviser-appears-to-dodge-question-on-taiwans-covid-19-response

‘The Guardian’ is seen as a liberal, left-leaning paper, and is probably more for the educated reader than mass circulation. As such, the language will be challenging but rewarding for English-language students.

In the interests of fairness, I will show the WHO reaction to the above interview, which was somewhat awkward or embarrassing, to say the least.

WHO response: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFRHB-wP9SU&t=13s

Finally, the most important part: what do you think ?

Where do you get your information ?

Can you trust your sources ?

Can you think of any reasons why news may be altered, slanted, taken out of context or in any way distorted ?

Listening skills: Real English, native and non-native speakers.

30th December 2019

This is the eve on a new IELTS class, utilising a new text book, and the first lesson is …listening. When I ask students (and they make the effort to reply) what is the hardest part of learning English, understanding the spoken word is invariably top of the list.

As with all skills, practice is the obvious answer, starting slowly, then building up and improving. Naturally, language skills are integrated; a knowledge of ‘chunking’ – or linking words together and natural contractions will be extremely beneficial. Likewise, the more vocabulary the student knows, the more chance they have of understanding what is being said.

The key problems are straightforward:

Speed of conversation.

Chunking, contractions, natural speech patterns (which differ markedly from the written word).

Accents (both native and non-native).

Unknown vocabulary.

Dialects, slang words, expressions, idioms … figurative not literal language.

Cultural references (subjects only known by local people)

This blog will feature various videos of people speaking English. I have suggested a number of teaching sites and videos on a former blog: https://thaypaulsnotes.com/2019/01/23/listening-skills-tips-and-links/

Now I will concentrate on ‘real-world’ examples, videos aimed at native speakers, not for English students.

I choose these videos to illustrate the whole world of spoken English; no disrespect is intended to anyone who speaks in a non-standard way, or is struggling with pronunciation. On the contrary, anyone who can converse in a second language has my utmost respect … it is a skill unavailable to the writer of this blog 😦

And now, without further ado, lets’s kick off with my hometown. Here’s some native Londoners having a chat (talking):

Native speakers in central London:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjEkotGQxzA

Image result for piccadilly circus people talking"

The subject of this video – which has useful captions, or subtitles, in English – is ‘which possession would you never lend to another person ?’ You will also be able to see some famous London landmarks.

TIPS: watch the video is short sections – maybe just in ten-second sections – repeat and repeat until you feel familiar with the words and are able to repeat them.

Street trader – London

Image result for london market trader"

Next up, a street-market trader. Here, the trader has to project his voice, to attract customers. It’s a mixture of commerce and performance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sw94R0P2dOs

An additional benefit from watching real-life videos is that you will pick up many expressions that you will simply not find in text books. Remember, many speaking tests give extra points for ‘natural language’. For example, the trader uses the phrase, “On and off,” meaning he has been doing the job but not continuously. Let’s say I have been teaching for ten years, but during that time, I took some long breaks, to study, to travel etc. I would say,”I’ve been teaching for ten years, on and off.

You will also notice how ‘real’ people often deviate from standard English. In this clip, the man says, “Me and my wife have been ….” though the ‘correct’, the standard form would be, “My wife and I have been …”. This merely illustrates that text guides are just that … a GUIDE … they are not real life. To learn English, to really learn, you must immerse yourself in videos, music, films and, dare I repeat myself (yes, I dare) PRACTICE.

British English speaker, Asian theme: east meets west

This is a favourite clip of mine, a British beer enthusiast trying a Vietnamese beer. This clip introduces new vocabulary relevant to beer (‘head’, ‘aroma’, ‘carbonated’, as well as some good expressions such as, “More than likely,” and, “Let’s dive in.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKr6Cj-Xr9g

Image result for rea; craft beers sai gon beer"

It’s Beer o’ clock !

I have a friend in the UK who likes, no … who LOVES beer. His passion is to review beers from around the world, and today, he tries Sai Gon Red.

What does he think of it ?

Pay attention to his body language, facial expression and intonation.

Listen out for adverbs (“I quite like the idea of drinking VN beer …”)

New vocabulary:

the channel – his personal YouTube. A TV station. In the USA, there are hundreds of TV channels.

regular – normal

aroma – smell of food or drink. Positive, a great smell.

head – the top of the beer

haze – fog, mist, not clear

carbonation – addition of CO2 to make it fizzy (like Cola) 

awful – very bad, terrible, horrible

suggestion – a little idea, a little bit of something

whatsoever– adverb (England have no chance of winning whatsoever)

Expressions:

‘coming in at’ – when he tells us the alcohol percentage. This expression can be used for any measurement – the new iPhone X comes in at 25m VND.

‘More than likely’ – very probably.

‘A tiny pinch of’ – a very small amount of something.

‘Let’s dive in’ – let start, let’s do it !

‘Oh, blimey’ – oi troi oi ! Oh, dear, OMG !

‘comes through’ – can see or sense something.

‘I’m gonna have trouble finishing it’ – it won’t be easy to drink it all.

‘I think we’ll call it quits there’ – time to stop.

‘I’m gonna give that one outter ten’ – I rate that one star out of a maximum of ten.

‘I’m afraid’ – I’m sorry (We have no more milk, I’m afraid).

Break down the speech into metaphors, expressions and new vocabulary (head, aroma)

Metaphor / Expressions / Vocabulary / phrasal verbs

Reported Speech

Direct speech: “It’s a false carbonated beer.” (it is a = present tense)

Reported speech The man said it was a false carbonated beer. (was = past)

For reported or indirect speech, we put the verb into the past tense. No speech marks.

Now lets go to the other side of the pond (across the Atlantic from the UK to the USA) and listen to some examples of American English:

Teaching Scenarios (USA)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7vmzvUTwag

I’ll ease you in softly; this first clip is designed for English learners, and has a variety of different scenes, actors and situations, all intended to prepare you for the variety of American accents … and in such a big continent, there are a wide variety of accents.

Is this easy to understand ? Do you notice any differences between the London accent and the USA accent ?

Same tip, watch as much as you can, pause, try to copy, say the words, then continue. When you feel confident, turn off the captions and see how much you are able to understand. Do not expect to understand everything. Maybe you will only understand half, but see how this figure increases with practice.

TV show, American accent.

This is from a USA sit-com called ‘Friends’ (1994 – 2004)

Image result for sitcome friends"

http://www.videosinlevels.com/people-do-chandler/

In this short clip, some friends are joking about the way one of them speaks, putting the stress on the ‘wrong’ word in a sentence. Again it has captions, so listen and … practice !

But now, time to turn it up a notch (make it harder). This clip is advanced, the speaker is very enthusiastic, very quick. and uses a lot of everyday phrases you will – more than likely – not know. Therefore, a quick pre-teaching session:

Image result for what to eat in berlin"

recommend– to suggest something good / something YOU think others will like

aside from– something else, apart from 

staple food– food that can be part of every meal (rice, bread, potatoes)

drowned– totally covered in a liquid or sauce

popular– something many people like (negative form is ‘unpopular’)

original– the first of something. Adverb is originally.

mix– adding two or more things together. Mixed is the past tense.

tons of– lots of (slang, common) e.g. Ha Noi has tons of coffee shops

amazing– adjective means really great, very special.

districts– areas of a city (Quan)

snack– eating food to stop you getting too hungry. Verb – snacking.

super– common adverb to mean very, very much e.g. Sai Gon is super hot.

New Vocabulary (Berlin 5 food):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aE6hW9Z09w

This video exemplifies all the problems students have listening to English: the vocabulary, the accent, the linking together and the sheer speed of speech. Don’t worry … apply the same principles; watch in small sections, read the captions, repeat and repeat until you feel comfortable. Remember – you don’t have to understand every word, just enough to follow what he is saying.

And now, let’s go to a land down under and listen to some different forms of English. This time, Australian:

Image result for friendly australian people"

Again, let’s take it easy to begin with, learn some Aussie (Australian) expressions and listen to the local accent:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDWsVXurkj8

This lists ten expressions that you may have heard in films or TV shows. But now it’s time to put them into practice. Here’s a genuine news story. Without using text or captions, how much can you understand ?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QCgqQdmr0M

The clip is called ‘Australian Hero’ so that should give you an idea.

Image result for australian news hero"

Bringing It All Back Home – an Australian in Vietnam

This ex-pat (someone who has emigrated from country and now lives and works in another) from down under (Australia) is going to show us where he lives in Sai Gon, District 3 (near the city centre) (0:22 – 0:45):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Qw_9HIU850

Listen for expressions, adverbs & adjectives

(He starts by saying he had some camera problems):

“Hopefully I’ve got that all sorted now and I can give you a decent tour of the …um, the apartment.

“It’s a really nice er, street here, sort of early morning and it’s quite a hustle and bustle. Here we got office workers coming out to eat and what have you.

“Ah, I’ll just take you into the er, where is this ? This is the actual building, here, and er … and this is where I actually, er … down, gotta (got to) go through this alley, it’s very congested … and this is how I get to where I live.”

And now the fun begins !

Quite possibly, the majority of my students will be using English as a lingua franca with other non-native speakers. I therefore encourage them to use the standard form, in order for them to be (hopefully) understood. I encourage slow and clear enunciation, avoidance of contractions and figurative language. Here, English is functional, precise communication is the aim.

We refer to this as a form of code-switching: basically changing the language to suit the occasion, something we all do naturally (for the most part). Namely, we change our vocabulary, syntax and accent(s) depending on whom we are addressing, be it a parent or younger brother, a police officer or a troublesome telesales caller, our manager, our colleague, our first-day intern.

Our first non-native speaker is from Germany. I had some students who worked here in Vietnam for a German company, so I felt it relevant they familiarise themselves with English through a German filter.

On a cultural note, many Germans have English as a second language, so travelling there only speaking English shouldn’t pose such a problem. UK and Germany have something of a ‘love-hate relationship’, with Britons seeing Germans as lacking in humour and having a very limited diet (potatoes, sauerkraut and sausage). Having said that, we secretly admire, if not envy, their efficiency and technological expertise, not to mention their success on the football field.

Working life in Germany:

In this clip, a worker is describing a typical German schedule (01.26 – 02.07):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGRXSpNMD4M

How long do they work in Germany ? How many breaks does the man have ?

You may start to notice slight mistakes in grammar and syntax (word order) yet the meaning should be very clear. Remember – you are not expected to be perfect, so never be discouraged.

The boot’s on the other foot

We’ve had native speakers talking about Vietnam. Now let’s have Vietnamese talking English

These young Vietnamese are offering advice to travellers about taxis and scams in Sai Gon:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyyQjZZRGaQ

Image result for avoid taxi scam in hcm"

New vocabulary:

tips– a piece of advice 

dishonest– not truthful 

options– choices 

to notice– to see

taxi stand– where taxis wait 

in my experience– what I have seen 

fake– not real

recommend– to say something is good 

convince– make people believe

What should a tourist be careful of in Sai Gon ?

Serendipity in South Korea

During one evening class, a student asked me for some advice; his manager is Korean and when the manager speaks to my student, in English, my poor student is unable to understand what is being said. Obviously, there is little I can do about the manager’s English, but I gave the student some useful phrases that are polite and should stop the Korean from ‘losing face’, and I’ll add these after the video.

Serendipity is a word for luck or coincidence. Just two days after this conversation, I was surfing on YouTube when I came across this perfect video from my new YouTube chum (friend), Ms Rachel Kim. Ms Rachel is very friendly and sweet, so I recommend you visit her channel, like and subscribe. I’m sure it will make her very happy.

Anyway, Ms Rachel made a video about trying to understand English spoken with a thick Korean accent. Starts at (0:46): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVJQK0t8m9s&list=PL97HViQblvdEM3zsauRxnIg1baFTNmsDM&index=19&t=2s

Image result for rachel Kim youtuber"

Thank you, Ms Rachel. Good luck with your channel

Should you find yourself in a similar situation, some useful phrases are:

I’m very sorry, could you repeat, please.

Would you mind speaking a little slower, please.

Excuse me, could you speak slower – my English is not good.

Now let’s really mix it up.

This one is very advanced. We have a man from the Indian sub-continent, speaking about life in Australia:

Image result for cost of living in australia"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdwiCxe8spI

Is this more of a challenge for you ? What are the problems with the accent ?