Get Back ! We spoke in the past tense.

9th November 2011

Recent online classes have revealed a distressing lack of ability using basic verbs in the past tense or Verb 2 as they are called in my neck of the woods.

In Vietnamese, the past tense is formed differently.

The verb remains the same but other words are added to indicate the tense. Alternately, time indicators are employed. Very briefly, a literal translation from the Vietnamese could be:

Yesterday I eat rice

Therefore a language teacher needs to be aware of the linguistic differences. Be that as it may let’s Get Back to basics.

Activity 1

What is the past tense (Verb 2) of these verbs:

eat / drink / do / play / see / go

Activity 2

see / help / visit / work / ride / talk

Activity 3

‘to be’:

I am / I was

you are / you were

he is / he was

she is / she was

Let’s use past tense (verb 2) with an adjective

Tell me what is the sentence if we use verb 2

EXAMPLE: I am happy. = I was happy.

NOW … YOUR TURN

You are sad = You ______ sad.

He is tired = He _______ tired.

She is funny = She _______ funny.

I am shy = I ______ shy.

He is small = He ______ small.

She is big = She _____ big.

You are young = You ______ young.

Activity 4

What did you do today ? 

Each student takes a turn. Use these photos to help you.

Extra practice:

buy / drink / surf the internet / help parents / cook / do homework / wake up

Related image
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Image result for go to school
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Present tense ——– Past tense

act —— acted

go —- went

learn —— learned OR learnt

play — played

read —– read (pronounced ‘red)

ride —— rode

sleep —– slept

watch —- watched (pronounced ‘watch -t‘)

win —- won

What is the past tense (Verb 2) ?

I act in a film. Last week I ______ in a film.

I go to London. Last year I _______________ to London.

I ride an elephant. Last month I ___________ an elephant.

I learn English. Last Saturday, we ___________ English with Mr Paul.

Piano playing monkey | Playing piano, See monkeys, Gershwin

The monkey plays piano.

Last night, the monkey _________ piano.

ally gong asian girl cute mug reading book inspiration milan kundera  ignorance - Ally Gong

She reads a book. Last Sunday she _____ a book.

Sleep may trigger rhythmic power washing in the brain | Science News

He sleeps all day. Yesterday he _______ all day.

Sam Raimi's original Spider-Man is a great New York movie

I watch the amazing Spiderman.

Last week I ______ the amazing Spiderman.

Put these verbs into the past tense, then complete the sentences:

want ———

take ———

decide ———

see ——–

buy ——–

think ——–

learn ——–

I —— to stay in bed this morning

She —– great photos with her new iPhoneX

We have (decide) —— to go to Thailand for Tet 

Last night I —- a great film !

He (buy) —- food for Christmas.

Tuesday ! I (think) —— today was Wednesday

We (learn) —– about past simple in our lesson.

More exercises can be found on this omnibus blog: https://thaypaulsnotes.com/2020/10/21/past-tense-various-exercises-2/

Please Note: All photos are taken from Google Images or free photo sites, and are used for educational purposes only. No copyright infringement or offense is intended. If I have used your photo or image, and you wish me to remove it, just ask. This site is not monetized, I run it on my own dollar. Thank you.

Students hate TO BE corrected, but teachers like TO ADDRESS issues.

9th March 2021

Socrates

Furthermore, she loves to wear Givenchy perfume but I prefer to spend my hard-earned* on Dior.

In the modern parlance, ‘Did you see what I did there ?’ I followed four auxiliary verbs (‘hate,’ ‘love,’ ‘like’ & ‘prefer’) with infinite verbs. I sense that I’ve already lost the interest of 90% of my readers with these grammar terms, but hold your horses and I’ll explain, I’ll ‘cut the crap‘, if you will.

Language bullies, pedants, and grammar nerds who correct people all the  time: Cut it out.

OK, breaks down like this: an auxiliary verb is a ‘helping’ verb; we need more information to understand what the speaker means e.g.

I want … (what do you want ?) // He needs … (what does he need ?) // She loves … // We want … etc

An infinite verb simply means a verb in no tense (past, present or future). It is simply formed thus:

to + base verb

Examples: to eat / to go / to study / to procrastinate

Infinite has no tense, by which I mean it is incorrect to say,

“Last night I to see a film,” (past tense)

“She to go home,” (present) or

“Tomorrow he will to take a test.” (future tense).

We can combine an auxiliary verb with an infinite verb, as demonstrated in the heading and subsequent paragraph.

So what's the problem? - david lynch 1 | Meme Generator

Occasionally, a student may question my use of grammar, or mention that they have been told a different rule, to wit, last night a student informed me that, according to a different teacher, auxiliary verbs such as ‘like,’ ‘love.’ ‘hate,’ HAVE TO BE followed by a continuous verb:

I hate shopping NOT I hate to shop

He loves watching films NOT He loves to watch films

We like drinking wine after work NOT We like to drink wine after work

To Quote Dr Johnson:

PPT - 1. Get Real: An Introduction to Plato PowerPoint Presentation, free  download - ID:2610551

“I refute it thus,” :

I like to play guitar / I hate to hear karaoke / I love to listen to my friend Pete’s online radio show

But don’t take my word for it; here’s a link to an appropriate page on the Cambridge Dictionary site: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/hate-like-love-and-prefer

Hatelikelove and prefer

Grammar > Verbs > Verb patterns > Hatelikelove and preferfrom English Grammar Today

We can use hate, like, love and prefer with an –ing form or with a to-infinitive:

hate to see food being thrown away.

love going to the cinema.

prefer listening to the news on radio than watching it on TV.

He prefers not to wear a tie to work.

In American English, the forms with to-infinitive are much more common than the –ing form.

There is a very small difference in meaning between the two forms. The -ing form emphasises the action or experience. The to-infinitive gives more emphasis to the results of the action or event. We often use the –ing form to suggest enjoyment (or lack of it), and the to-infinitive form to express habits or preferences.

So there you have it, straight from the horse’s mouth.

What can we learn from this ? Well, teachers are only human (mostly) and can make mistakes. Non-native speaker teachers often teach from books that may simplify grammar and may therefore, inadvertently, be incorrect in their assertions. The books may be outdated; they may even be wrong.

Just because something is written in a book, doesn’t mean it’s true.

Check for yourself, be proactive in your learning; if you have internet access, check reputable websites.

Furthermore, even native-speakers can be wrong and I’ll be the first to admit this (even if I don’t have the wisdom of Socrates, not by a long chalk).

And now, a shout-out to a dear friend, the aforementioned Pete, who has a magnificent online radio show entitled ‘Flatwound’s Sounds‘. I listened to his most recent offering as I typed this blog and I’d like to recommend it to y’all: https://www.mixcloud.com/flatwoundssounds/flatwounds-sounds-miscellany-show-19-4th-march-2021/

flatwounds.sounds | Mixcloud
https://www.mixcloud.com/flatwoundssounds/flatwounds-sounds-miscellany-show-19-4th-march-2021/

* hard-earned cash = money or wages from a hard job.