Young Learners, levels 3 & 4. Tell me a Classical story

2nd December 2022

Today we shall focus on story-telling, using nouns, adjectives, verbs (in the past tense or Verb 2) and linking words.

Students can also practise intonation and pronunciation when they make their presentation.

Quite simply the class, in small teams, are going to retell the story of Theseus and the Minotaur. We have covered this myth several times already, but here’s a quick reminder curtsey of the good people at Lego:

If the class works in small groups, it could be a good idea to give them some large paper in order for some to draw, while others write. However, every member of the team must write something, and speak during the presentation.

First, a quick recap:

Every year, the King of Athens has to send 12 children to Crete to feed the Minotaur. The King’s son, Theseus, said he will go and kill the monster.

When Theseus and the children arrive in Crete, Princess Ariadne sees Theseus and falls in love. She says she will help him.

The Minotaur lives in a labyrinth, or maze, and it is very hard to get out. However, the Princess gives Theseus some string, so he can find the exit.

Soon, the Minotaur smells the Greek hero and they fight but Theseus wins and the Minotaur is dead. The children are safe.

Theseus and Ariadne sail away from Crete back to Greece.

Now … your turn

Write and draw this story. First you, like Theseus, need some weapons, only your weapons will be words:

NOUNS Greek / hero / Prince / Princess / labyrinth / sword / string or thread

VERBS fight / sail / defeat / fall in love / smell /

ADJECTIVES brave / beautiful / scary / terrifying / strong / intelligent / dark / cold / hideous / overjoyed / celebrate

LINKING WORDS and / as well as / but / however / because / also /

Naturally, they lived happily ever after … well, not really, but that’s another set of stories.

Titian (1506 – 1576) Bacchus and Ariadne 1521 – 1523 in London’s National Gallery

Please Note: All photos are taken from Google Images or free photo sites, and are used for educational purposes only. No copyright infringement or offense is intended. If I have used your photo or image, and you wish me to remove it, just ask. This site is not monetized, I run it on my own dollar. Thank you.

One thought on “Young Learners, levels 3 & 4. Tell me a Classical story

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.